Inspiration Album

Dining

Dining room

We knew that home design for babies and children was an area of great interest to many, but instead of letting it creep into our Home sites, we've split it off and launched our newest site this morning: The Nursery. It's all about that part of the home that's about kids. Like all our sites, it's all about making your home beautiful, organized and healthy.

Country dining room

It's the first weekend of our new home project series, and Apartment Therapy blogger Lauren is here to show you her process on this weekend's assignment: Filling a blank wall in your home! From Lauren: Some people might appreciate the fact that their small space doesn't offer much wall space for art, but I'm not one of them. When I saw this assignment, a space didn't immediately come to mind - until I remembered the odd bit of wall space between the chair and bookshelf in our family room. Art used to hang here, but I ended up stealing 95% of it to use in another art wall that I created elsewhere in the space. The wall has a strange layout due to a sconce and light switch that prevents one large piece of artwork from being properly hung. So I decided to cobble together my collection of vagrant artwork and see if I could create another gallery wall of sorts. First I measured out the wall and rolled out a large section of craft paper that had about the same dimensions. I used a Sharpie to draw on the furniture items and light fixtures that were already taking up space on the wall. After I found a layout that worked, I traced the frames and prints onto the craft paper, cut them out, and taped the craft paper up on the wall in the same way that I had laid it out on the floor, just to be sure it would work in reality.

Small dining room

Let us for a moment throw the practical and pragmatic out the window and indulge in a little bit of fantasy home daydreaming, allowing ourselves to consider the details of a dream home filled with the latest technologies. The Kohler Numi, a luxury toilet features a motion-activated cover and seat, self cleaning bidet, integrated air dryer, heated seat, foot warmer, and Bluetooth connectivity. BedroomThe bedroom, a sanctuary for peace, calm, and rest. What's this? A television set in the bedroom? For those who must, here's a luxurious and aesthetics solution which doesn't take over the bedroom. Comprised of an automated TV lift which controls the display at the touch of a button, the Nexus 21 offers multiple variations, from pop-up lifts that hide the television set in furniture, to drop down setups that store the television in the ceiling. With the TV tucked out of the way, the bedroom can at least give the appearances of being distraction and screen-free. So now instead of staring at what's in the fridge, we might just be staring at what's on the fridge. 'Home OfficeIt can be too easy to get distracted while working from home, when a couch and television are mere feet away. But when imagining working from the Emperor 200, chances are I'd have no desire to ever leave. Looking like something straight out of a sci-fi film, this luxe workstation costs a whopping $50,000 for an assemblage of premium features: touch screen control center, an air filtering system, light therapy, electric powered leather seat, surround sound system, and three 27' LED screens. Living RoomWhat does nearly $40,000 get you? The Samsung S9 ultra-HD display, available at a near projection-screen 85' diagonal size. This is the opposite of the Nexus 21 above: the S9 is for people who want to make their television the center and focal point of their room. At this size, there's no way you could ignore a 4K screen this large and clear.

Dining room with bay views

Maybe it's because I grew up in the 80s and never had to experience it firsthand, but I have a strange fascination with the interior design of the 70s. There are strange shapes, strange colors, strange things that you never thought you would see in an home, but there they are, bold and unabashed. In the 1970s, interior design reached a level of raw exuberance that has never been equaled since. I had a lot of fun gathering together these examples of the worst excesses of the 70s. Take a tour with me of 10 interiors so outlandish they couldn't possibly be real - but they were. Above: If your houseplants match your bedspread which matches your wallpaper which matches your striped shades which match your carpet deep enough for a toddler to get lost in, you might be living in the 70s. This delightful space occured in a 70s-era issue of Better Homes and Gardens. One of my favorite things about the 70s is the way designers played with alternative kinds of seating, resulting in installations like this one, which straddles the boundary between furniture and architecture. Crazy graphics painted on the wall was also a big thing in the 70s. Best if they matched the sofa. Compared to the other stuff we've seen here, this interior is positively restrained, but the lucite tables and curvy, womblike furniture still give it a bit of wacky 70s flair. While these interiors may seem wild to us, in the world of high design there were even crazier things afoot. One of my very favorite things to come out of the 70s was this installation by designer Verner Panton, who sought to completely redefine the way we think about interiors. What do you think? Does 70s design speak to some place, deep in your soul, that craves the funk? Do you feel repulsed but also strangely drawn to this kind of design? Or just repulsed? Please tell.

Modern dining room

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Dining room

There's design that looks good, and then there's design that advances the ball. This dining table by Elad Kashi for Yanko Design falls into the latter category. We weren't sure what to make of TableSet at first until we realized that the undulating surface is actually ceramic. Ceramic plates and bowls together form the actual tabletop. When the meal is over, simply place all the pieces in the dishwasher.

Dining room

We didn't think it was possible for us to fall in love with a lamp any more than Ilse Crawford's unpretentioius Studioilse w08 desk light. We just saw her new wall lamp - its new, grown-up friend.... Earlier this month at the Stockholm Furniture Fair, Swedish lighting company Wastberg launched the new w093w halogen wall lamp by studioilse. Ilse Crawford reportedly developed the new wall light, based on the w08 desk lamp she created last year for the company. The w093w uses the same honest wood, iron and porcelain and adds simple pulley system so that the height of its porcelain shade can be adjusted to fit your table or desk. We can't get enough of the combination of these simple materials, red cord and weight system. Having lived with bare bulbs in our eclectic dining room for several years, we think we finally found the perfect table lamp. According to the folks at Wastberg, the lamp is still a 'Work in progress' and will be on the market sometime this autumn. In the meantime, you can check out these swing-arm wall lamps we rounded up last year.

Dining room

Here's a small break from all the Smallest Coolest entries and house tours we've been posting...something a little left of the ordinary. Artist Kazmierz Szmauz's three bookshelf designs might not be for everyone, but they're likely to induce a smile from just about everyone.... The Bookman measures 70 inches high by 45 inches wide and is made from Mahogany, although other woods can be used. Shelves are best adapted to books beneath 8 inches in height. Bookman 1 can be ordered and collected from our shop or shipped at cost to anywhere in the world. Please allow a few weeks as each Bookman is individually built on demand.

Dining room

Wendy fell so in love with the character and charm of this rental apartment she was a bit blind to the stained, outdated wallpaper in the bedroom. After moving in, she realized an update was needed, and she went with a dark and dramatic color palette. When my children and I moved into our rental apartment last winter, I was so wowed by the charm and character of our new space that I scarcely noticed the dingy, stained wallpaper covering every room in the house. When you walk into an apartment and see built-ins, pocket doors and fireplaces with original tile you can overlook the little things like mysterious blood splatters on the walls, right? My landlord gave me permission to paint, but with the stipulation that I did not remove the wallpaper I painted away and miraculously the wallpaper didn't fall off in a big, wet paint heap. The stains are gone, the walls are still intact and this formerly drab and dreary room is now my most favorite room in our home.

Vibrant yellow kitchen

We love this heat sensitive wallpaper but it would never work at our place. The Yala Sofa by Elliat Rich would suit us perfectly as our couches are the central place in our home. The fabric on the sofa is printed with thermochromatic ink and appears as above until someone sits on. See what the warmed up fabric looks like below the jump. The flowers printed on the fabric are from the Ipomoea plant which is also know as the Bush Potato and is a source of native food to those located in the central desert. Similar to the sofa flowering once it warms up, the Ipomoea plant flowers after desert rains.

Dining room

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Dining room

Wallpaper has the ability to create a story and set the mood in a room and I especially do a mental cheer when I see it used fearlessly in children's rooms. Here are a dozen children's rooms and nurseries where wallpaper is the superstar.

Dining table

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Dining room

For today's color combo, we thought we'd start with black and white, then spin the wheel for bold accent colors. We love the way yellow offsets the high-contrast scheme in this room, so we went on a search for other cool rooms that do the same using orange, purple, green, blue, red, and pink.... Black, White, and just a tiny bit of Red: Vitra.

Dining room

Sculptural lamps create instant drama, especially when placed on or near the floor. Lighting placed low provides great ambiance at a party, creating a soft light that reflects off freshly cleaned floors. These Castore Lamps would create an interesting focal point, grouped together on a low table. These Luau Portable Lamps could be used outside or indoors. The lamp uses replaceable LEDs that last 6-10 hours. These birch lamps are meant to create 'a forest of light.' The shade is made from silk and printed with a birch bark pattern. They're small, but they would look great lined up along a low ledge. Birch lamps come in a set of 3, available at Lekker for $450. Links to Other Sculptural Lamps: Gus Design Group Lightbox, $293 at Design Public.

Dining room with glass table

Last week, blogging collections, we suddenly remembered the genesis of the obsession: the colorful pottery our parents lugged back from Italy and hung on the stucco walls of their wood beamed dining room. While the look seem a little old-school for us, we wondered...would the hanging plates translate into our own home? A glimmer of an idea surfaced when we saw these plates for sale in the Room Service Home Catalog. It wasn't until we happened upon Ma Maison Sofitel's take on it that we reconsidered. Instead of ordered columns of patterned crockery on pale walls, an organic, amorphous arrangement of subtly glazed plates spreads out over a dark background. We have a beautiful set of orange dishware we seldom use that we know will give us more pleasure on our yellow walls than hiding in the drawer; even white plates on white walls could add interesting texture to an otherwise stark modern room. We've had our eye on new tableware for a while. Knowing it will serve a dual purpose might be just the impetus we need to get it.